Quick Summary:

“The overall diets of the high prevalence areas for Multiple Sclerosis have certain features in common including high dairy, cereal grain and saturated fat consumptions.”

We have summarized the findings of various published research articles on Multiple Sclerosis and Food Hypersensitivities and also have attached a Review Article on Multiple Sclerosis and Food Hypersensitivities by Ashton F. Embry.

  1. The overall diets of the high prevalence areas for Multiple Sclerosis have certain features in common including high dairy, cereal grain and saturated fat consumptions. These are all much higher than in the low prevalence areas. The great differences in diet between the high prevalence areas and the low prevalence areas can readily account for the occurrence of two very different risk areas in the world. It would appear that the foods consumed in high prevalence areas (e.g. dairy, cereal grains, high saturated fat) are more effective in causing MS as has been noted in various statistical studies (Shatin, 1964; Alter et al., 1974; Agranoff and Goldberg, 1974; Malosse et al., 1992; Lauer, 1994). Shatin (1964) found a good correspondence of MS prevalence with wheat consumption. Malosse et al. (1992) state “We have studied the relationship between MS prevalence and dairy product consumption in 27 countries and 29 populations all over the world. A good correlation (p=0.836) was found; this correlation was highly significant (p<0.001)”. This echoed Agranoff and Goldberg (1974) who almost 20 years earlier had stated “a geographic predisposing factor in multiple sclerosis … is directly related to milk consumption”. Alter et al. (1974) found a significant correlation (0.7) between consumption of animal fats and MS prevalence. Furthermore on the basis of a recent multivariate analysis, Lauer (1994) concludes “The second MS-related bundle comprised characteristics … with dietary variables (i.e. a diet low in fish and high in dairy products)”.
  2. Diet is readily compatible with the north/south gradient because diet varies directly with climate and thus latitude. The diets of cooler, more temperate regions include much more saturated fat, dairy and cereal grains which, as discussed above, are the most problematic foods.
  3. A number of research publications support omission of dairy, cereal grain- wheat products, and saturated fat from diet of patients with MS.  Our IgG standard food panel may not pick up all sensitivities as some allergic responses are not due to IgG antibodies but may also be due to other antibodies such as IgA, or IgE as well as T lymphocyte reactivities and other immune networks, as this is a complex disease.
  4. Multiple Sclerosis is a complex autoimmune disease effected by IgG, IgA, IgE, as well as, T lymphocyte reactivities and other immune networks. It is possible that foods induce an immune response with cross reactivity to myelin basic protein eliciting immune reactivity across the blood brain barrier. Much research has yet to be done to unravel the pathogenesis of Multiple Sclerosis


Multiple Sclerosis and Food Hypersensitivities
Ashton F. Embry — Read the article by Ashton F. Embry (http://chetday.com/msandfood.html)